CST

Patch Antenna Array

Interference

Antenna Arrays like this can be studied efficiently using CST MICROWAVE STUDIOs postprocessing engine. Near- and farfield combinations for arbitrary amplitudes and phase angles at each input port can be calculated in seconds. The calculation of one patch antenna in the time domain requires about ten minutes with MICROWAVE STUDIOs transient solver.


Circular patch antenna array
Figure 1: Circular patch antenna array

The antenna array consists of four circular patches, each of which are excited by a coaxial feed, placed slightly off-center. The front corner has been cut away in order to show the coaxial feed.


Destructive Interference
Figure 2: Destructive Interference


Constructive Interference
Figure 3: Constructive Interference


CST Article "Patch Antenna Array"
last modified 12. Dec 2006 12:12
printed 5. May 2015 12:07, Article ID 9
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